Goat Hikes are Back!

May 7th, 2014
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We’ll be heading out on a goat hike through the Ten Apple woods this Saturday, May 10, leaving the barn around 11am. The hike consists of an approximately 1.5-2 mile loop through the woods on generally well maintained trails. There is some steep terrain. Children must be at least 8 years old and accompanied by an adult. Along the way we’ll talk about goats as pack animals and you’ll learn a thing or two about raising and caring for goats. After the hike you’ll be able to try some goat milk and some of our Ten Apple Farm goat cheese. $10 per adult, $5 for kids. Minimum: 6 people; Maximum: 15 people. Contact us to RSVP.

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posted by Announcements

Signs of Spring

March 20th, 2014
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Margaret feeds Toka's new buckling, first kid of the Spring.

Margaret feeds Toka’s new buckling, first kid of the Spring.

It’s been pretty cold this week, and we got fresh snow last night, but there are signs of spring all over the farm. The sap is running and there’s a pot simmering on the wood stove. The fig tree, brought in for winter, is starting to bud in the cellar. The biggest sign that spring has arrived are the new goat kids bleating away for their bottles of milk in a big cardboard box in the “back house.” Two goats have kidded, and two to go. Toka gave birth to a boy and a girl early Sunday morning, and last night (at midnight!) Flyrod gave birth to a boy and a girl, as well. After several months of no milking, our hands are sore, but glad to be getting back into the rhythm of the season. The sun is out today and the snow is melting. It won’t be too long before these kids (goat and human) are running around on green grass.

 

Box of Kids: Toka's and Flyrod's kids hang out in their cardboard box in the backhouse.

Box of Kids: Toka’s and Flyrod’s kids hang out in their cardboard box in the back house.

Sadie meets the new buckling

Sadie meets the new buckling

Charlotte shows off Toka's doeling, born Sunday

Charlotte shows off Toka’s doeling, born Sunday

Charlotte introduces Toka's doeling to Uncle Godfrey

Charlotte introduces Toka’s doeling to Uncle Godfrey

Bea and Charlotte inspect the sap buckets

Another sign of Spring: Bea and Charlotte inspect the sap buckets

 

 

 

 

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posted by Announcements, Goats

W. Stephen Hathaway, 1945-2013

December 26th, 2013
"Grampa Steve" with Charlotte, Sadie, Margaret and Beatrice, Hanukkah 2013
“Grampa Steve” with Charlotte, Sadie, Margaret and Beatrice, Hanukkah 2013

We mourn the passing of Steve Hathaway, Margaret’s father, who died Thursday, December 26, after a week of hospice care in our home. His final illness was not prolonged, and he passed peacefully and without pain. Margaret was holding his hand when he died.

As many of you know, Steve’s health had been declining over the past few months. We’re all sad and exhausted, but so thankful to have had this time with him. He made it to Christmas, which he was thrilled to be able to celebrate with the girls, and he went gently and surrounded by love. His spirit and generous heart will be greatly missed.

W. Stephen Hathaway was born in Tucson, Arizona, on June 5, 1945. He was the eldest of five children, and was raised in Mt. Clemens, Michigan. Steve attended Michigan State University, and served in the Peace Corps in Trinidad and as a translator in Vietnam before earning his MFA at Bowling Green State University. There he met his (former) wife, Jeanine, and the two moved to Wichita, where they joined the English department, and where their daughter Margaret was born.

Steve taught creative writing and American literature at WSU from 1974-2012, where he was a beloved teacher, mentor, and friend. His infectious chuckle and colorful language rang through the halls of the English department for decades. The recipient of a Creative Writing Fellowship Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Steve spent a sabbatical year in Cambridge, England, in 1982. His collection of short stories, A Kind of Redemption, was published by LSU Press in 1991.

A committed Democrat, Steve ran for state legislature in Kansas twice, dotting his heavily Republican district with signs that read “Who is this Steve Hathaway?” (Needless to say, he lost.) An enthusiastic outdoorsman, Steve hiked, camped and fished throughout the West. Retiring in 2012, Steve bought a house in the woods in Maine, on property near his family at Ten Apple Farm. He spent his last year and a half tramping around his woods, bumbling around L.L. Bean, and reluctantly helping with farm chores–tales of his duck herding and skunk trapping have already passed into family lore. Happily, Maine provided a Republican governor for him to curse.

Mostly, Grampa Steve doted on his granddaughters, driving on school field trips, teaching the girls to fish and ride their bikes, hosting family movie nights, and becoming a fixture at gymnastics, ballet, and Girl Scouts. His final illness was swift, and he stayed himself to the end, warming himself by the wood stove, sneaking candy to the girls, orchestrating Christmas dinner, and rereading Nabokov’s Speak, Memory in the days leading up to his passing. At his request, there will not be a funeral, but we are planning to celebrate his life at a Festival of Steve, at his home, in early June. Donations in his memory can be made to Wichita’s public radio station, KMUW, and to Levey Day School in Portland, Maine.

KMUW
3317 E 17th St. N.
Wichita, KS  67208
*
Levey Day School
400 Deering Avenue
Portland, ME  04103

View a gallery of Steve through the years on the Ten Apple Farm Facebook page

We invite you to share stories of Steve in the comments section.

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posted by Announcements

My Garden – A Poem By Charlotte

November 17th, 2013
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The girls and our final apple harvest for the season

The girls and our final apple harvest for the season

As we continue to wind the farm down for winter, picking the last apples and digging up the last potatoes, Charlotte wrote this poem in her home writing journal. It’s a combination of non-fiction and fiction, she points out. The “fiction” is contained in the last line.

My Garden
My Garden grows
in summer
not winter fall
or spring
when plants die
it’s a bummer
but I remember
just one thing
the plants were
so delicious we
cooked them
in a meal
they were also
so nutritious we
cooked them
with an eel
*
Grampa Steve lends a hand digging potatoes

Grampa Steve lends a hand digging potatoes

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posted by cute kids, Garden, Poems

Bea’s Haunted Barn

October 31st, 2013
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A witch (Beatrice) stirs her cauldron while horned beasts watch inside the Ten Apple Farm haunted barn

A witch (Beatrice) stirs her bubbling cauldron while horned beasts watch inside the Ten Apple Farm haunted barn

A celebration of both Halloween and Bea’s half-birthday, a scary and fun time was had by all at the first annual Ten Apple Farm haunted barn party. The party featured tours of the spooked out barn filled with ghosts, witches, bats, skeletons, cackling chickens and horrible horned monsters (ok, just the goats); bobbing for apples, and a delicious eyeball and worm cake. We’re already planning next year’s barn.

Bea and friends...

Bea and friends...

Bobbing for apples

Bobbing for apples

Half a cake for a half birthday!

Half a cake for a half birthday!

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posted by Uncategorized ,

Last Harvest of the Year

October 26th, 2013
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Sadie shows off a green bean she picked before the first hard freeze of the season. Other than some potatoes still hiding in the ground, this marked the end of our garden harvest.

Sadie shows off a green bean she picked before the first hard freeze of the season. Other than some potatoes still hiding in the ground, this marked the end of our garden harvest.

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posted by cute kids, Garden ,

Maine Chicken Coop Tour this Saturday!

September 24th, 2013
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coop_2We’ll be taking part in the First Annual Maine Chicken Coop Tour that will be held this Saturday, September 28, 2013 from 10AM – 4PM. This self-guided tour will showcase an array of backyard chicken coops that display a variety of construction designs and materials, from recycled to custom designed coops. Inspired by the Funky Chicken Coop Tour in Austin, Texas, the organizers of the tour hope to bring together chicken enthusiasts while encouraging education, community, and local food.

The tour is for anyone planning to start their own backyard flock, and/or curious about why keeping backyard chickens is so popular. It is free to attend and open to the public.

What tour goers will see: Different styles of coops including an old farmhouse coop that has been customized, several coops made from unassembled and assembled kits created by the Maine company Roots, Coops & More (http://www.rootscoopsandmore.com), and coops created from plans found on the Internet or in a book. Some coops are stand alones, some are built into a barn or other farm structure.

Ask owners about using reclaimed or recycled materials, brooding chicks, protecting a flock from weather extremes, choosing a breed, predation prevention, and even composting coop litter.

Along with chickens, tour goers will have the opportunity to see honeybees, gardens, sheep, goats, and donkeys.

Due to insurance reasons, homeowners are unable to let participants use their bathrooms or enter their homes. Tour goers should plan accordingly and leave pets at home. Additionally, for bio-security purposes tour goers are asked to refrain from handling birds or touching structures, bedding or equipment during their visit.

Click here for a list of the locations or visit the Tour Facebook page for updates.

Click here for a map of participating locations.

Hope to see you Saturday!

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posted by Announcements, Events, poultry ,

The Goat of Yom Kippur

September 13th, 2013
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Stew will be making a special appearance, playing the role of "scapegoat" at Congregation Shaaray Tphiloh Yom Kippur services this year.
Stew will be making a special appearance, playing the role of “scapegoat,” at Congregation Shaarey Tphiloh Yom Kippur services this year.

Dear Friends,

Boys and girls, I wish you a meaningful Yom Kippur.

I am the goat of Yom Kippur.  I hope you can see my picture of me and my goatee in this email.  I will be at Shaarey Tphiloh tomorrow for the children’s service at 10:30 a.m..  I am a virtual replica of the ancient goat from Temple times.

Have you heard of the scapegoat?  That’s me.  You can blame me for everything, and I can handle it.  Whisper your sins to me and any wrongdoing will be made better.

In the ancient Temple, the high priest put his hands on one goat and sent it off somewhere with the sins of Israel, and one goat went to God.  Rabbi Akiva Herzfeld will read this section from the Torah scroll in shul tomorrow.

I’ll be by the shul representing a different perspective on the Torah reading.

My name is Stew, and I’m from Ten Apple Farm of Maine. I don’t know where I’m headed this year, but I know I will be at shul on Yom Kippur.  I hope you can join me in prayyyyerr.

I am a grand metaphor.  I am the goat-ified Law of God.  You will see me and behold Awe and Ehhhhs.

If you have done wrong, you can tell me and I can take care of it.

Service times at Shaarey Tphiloh:

Kol Nidre: 6:30 p.m. Saturday Morning: 8:30 a.m.
Children’s Service (with Stew the goat): 10:30 a.m.
Yizkor  11 a.m.
Healing Service 4:30 p.m.  Mincha 5:30 p.m.
Final Shofar: 7:30 p.m.

Good yomtov and a good year.

Rabbi Akiva Herzfeld
Cong. Shaarey Tphiloh
76 Noyes Street
Portland, Maine  04103
www.mainesynagogue.org/wp

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posted by Announcements, Goats, Judaism , , , ,

10 Years Ago, Hard to Believe

August 29th, 2013
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Ten year ago... so young... so unaware of what was about to happen...

It’s hard to believe it was 10 years ago this week that this wild ride we’ve been on all began… with a wild ride. Here’s to 10 more years of fun, and never moving again.

You can read all about it here.


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posted by Uncategorized

A Sip and a Snake

August 6th, 2013
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Our mixologist, Charlotte, and one of her (non-alcoholic) mixed drinks

Our resident mixologist, Charlotte, and one of her (non-alcoholic) mixed drinks

Biggie the snake has been tormenting Margaret and Charlotte all summer. He claimed half our front gardens, hiding in the spiderwort and slithering out from under the fuchsia bee balm when we least expected. He made us nervous to pick the raspberries next to railing, and to take out the compost in anything shorter than Wellies. The girls (and the mama) watched him from the porch for months as the weeds crowded our perennials, but when he actually slithered up under a rocker, it was time for action. And when Biggie was joined by new snake Smalls, Karl put on his snake catching gloves and got to work, with pajama-clad assistant Bea in tow. Biggie was re-homed about a mile away on a nice, warm rock in a meadow. Smalls, still on the loose but much less threatening, was last spotted under the hydrangea. We celebrated with one of Charlotte’s latest creations, a “Chai Blossom” garnished  with star anise, slices of custard pie dotted with the season’s last sour cherries, and a goat hike.

Karl with "Biggie" the snake

Karl with "Biggie" the snake (photo by Charlotte Schatz)

Karl & Beatrice with "Biggie"

Karl & Beatrice with "Biggie" (Photograph by Charlotte Schatz)

Cherries!

Cherries!

Goat hiking

Goat hiking

Milking lesson post goat hike

Milking lesson post goat hike

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posted by Food, Goat hikes, Workshops